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Discussion Starter #1
New chain w/ retaining clip:


Question 1: The pins still need to be pressed even though there's a clip, right? This guy didn't do it (skip to 6:20ish) --

I have the press tool so it's no big deal, I just want to make sure I don't screw it up. How do I make sure I don't press it too much and cause a stiff link?

Question 2: What's the best way to align the rear wheel and set the chain tension?
 

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You press the pinned portion of the link in enough so that there is sufficient room to put the orings, plate and clip on. There is a cut away on the end of the pins. I don't have the proper tool, always used needle nose vise grip to push in the pins. Make sure the clip is put on the right way. When the chain is rotating (bike going forward) the closed end of the clip rotates over the counter (front) sprocket. Chain tension is dependent on the bike. My KTM likes to be a loose whore, the DRZ is about 1.5-2 inches. I use my fingers as a gauge. Too tight will wear your counter sprocket seal. Look up your bike specs on line. Good luck, S.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well this isn't an O-ring chain... You can see in the picture above that the pins are already in far enough to put the clip on and if I pressed the pins at all they would pinch the clip. That doesn't sound right, does it?

I bought the chain press shown here because the BikeBandit people said it was the right one for this chain, but it seems like maybe that's only for O-ring chains?

 

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Jackie Chan's stuntdouble
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Question 1: The pins still need to be pressed even though there's a clip, right?
Hmm, maybe you are thinking of a rivet link. You need a riveting tool for that, which is not what you have.

For a clip link, you just need to press the side plate on over the pins.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Hmm, maybe you are thinking of a rivet link. You need a riveting tool for that, which is not what you have.

For a clip link, you just need to press the side plate on over the pins.
So... Once the clip.. uh.. clips on, then I'm done right? Forgive the stupid questions but I've done this a hundred times on my bicycle and never on my motorcycle.
 

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For a clip link, you just need to press the side plate on over the pins.
That's right, make sure you have the clip pointing in the right direction
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I agree, clip on you are done. What bike is the chain for?
Thanks for confirming that common sense is in fact the best way to proceed... Just wanted to make sure before I did anything stupid! The bike is a 1980 Honda CB400T Hawk.
 

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Bad Motherfucker
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Thanks for confirming that common sense is in fact the best way to proceed... Just wanted to make sure before I did anything stupid! The bike is a 1980 Honda CB400T Hawk.
Why no "O" ring chain?? They last alot longer and are much quieter
 

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Thank goodness you're not putting that garbage on a real bike, I was about to come down on you like god. Clip links are shit for anything with real power, the weakest link.

A proper rivet link is the only way to go and have it 100% reliable. I've beaten the shit out of my chains on big power liters bikes, no issues. I've snapped off two chains in my life, both clips styles on much less powerfull bikes. On the street, you need reliability. If you were racing and constantly changing gearing and wheels (SM to Dirt), then it has a purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank goodness you're not putting that garbage on a real bike, I was about to come down on you like god. Clip links are shit for anything with real power, the weakest link.
Thanks for reminding me why I stopped coming here.
 
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