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I just got back from a jaunt up to our family cabin in the Chilcotin. On the way up, we travelled the 'side' route from Pavillion over the top to Kelly Lake, south of Clinton; north on the Jesmond Rd, on the west side of the Marble Range; onward thru cattle country along the Fraser past Big Bar, Canoe Crk, Gang Ranch, and Alkali Lake; eventually arriving in Williams Lake 4 1/2 hours from Pavilion. A bit of this I had travelled before, but much of it was new to me, and I was astonished at the varied terrain and ongoing fabulous scenery.


And - to get to the point, in a motorcycle forum - we passed 2 or 3 pairs of guys on 'backcountry' bikes of various sorts, mostly KTMs, I'd judge, and mostly 'full-sized'. Kinda got me thinking, what would I buy if I were gonna tackle this stuff in any significant way. The DR-Z400 is probably the 'best' choice, cuz it's cheap, simple, reliable, and pretty light. But it's also not much fun to travel the 250kms to get to and from anywhere... The Kawasaki KLR650 has a big following too, and many of the above comments and cavils apply. Experienced dirt riders might be able to handle the 'heft' of the big ADV bikes, but I reckon they are just too much mass for me. Which got me thinking about the KTM 790 Adventure... well-equipped; capable; tough; 189kgs; born of 'the dirt', etc... And then there's the new Tenere 700: cheaper; about 15 kgs heavier; not as dirt focussed. And at that point I stumbled across Ryan F9's typically incisive review. He likes it...


 

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15kg heavier?

Reviews and comparo's I've read and watched between the T and 790ADV list the Yamaha at 1kg lighter.

It's also over a grand cheaper, and not a basket case of unreliability LOL...
 

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I had hoped yamaha would make a touring version of the fz07 like they did with the fj09. Great engine that 690 although the tranny is not the smoothest.
 

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15kg heavier?

Reviews and comparo's I've read and watched between the T and 790ADV list the Yamaha at 1kg lighter.

It's also over a grand cheaper, and not a basket case of unreliability LOL...
YL, just going off manufacturer's sites. Yamaha lists the T700 at 204 kg wet; KTM lists the 790 at 189 kgs. of course, reality may differ...
 

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YL, just going off manufacturer's sites. Yamaha lists the T700 at 204 kg wet; KTM lists the 790 at 189 kgs. of course, reality may differ...
ADV pulse and Cycle World threw them on a scale:

Tenere 452 fully fuelled
790 ADV 460 fully fuelled

BUT... The KTM holds 3.7L (1 gall) more fuel so I'd call it a draw.
 

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I just got back from a jaunt up to our family cabin in the Chilcotin. On the way up, we travelled the 'side' route from Pavillion over the top to Kelly Lake, south of Clinton; north on the Jesmond Rd, on the west side of the Marble Range; onward thru cattle country along the Fraser past Big Bar, Canoe Crk, Gang Ranch, and Alkali Lake; eventually arriving in Williams Lake 4 1/2 hours from Pavilion. A bit of this I had travelled before, but much of it was new to me, and I was astonished at the varied terrain and ongoing fabulous scenery.



And - to get to the point, in a motorcycle forum - we passed 2 or 3 pairs of guys on 'backcountry' bikes of various sorts, mostly KTMs, I'd judge, and mostly 'full-sized'. Kinda got me thinking, what would I buy if I were gonna tackle this stuff in any significant way. The DR-Z400 is probably the 'best' choice, cuz it's cheap, simple, reliable, and pretty light. But it's also not much fun to travel the 250kms to get to and from anywhere... The Kawasaki KLR650 has a big following too, and many of the above comments and cavils apply. Experienced dirt riders might be able to handle the 'heft' of the big ADV bikes, but I reckon they are just too much mass for me. Which got me thinking about the KTM 790 Adventure... well-equipped; capable; tough; 189kgs; born of 'the dirt', etc... And then there's the new Tenere 700: cheaper; about 15 kgs heavier; not as dirt focussed. And at that point I stumbled across Ryan F9's typically incisive review. He likes it.

You probably don't remember me but I did one of my first distance road rides with you and Josh many years ago on my then brand new GS 1200. Well after a couple years chasing Josh on pavement I finnaly realized that ADV bikes simply do not have the high speed handling characteristics of sportbikes but it was sure fun figuring that out😁
I slowly started moving over to what the bike was meant for and let me tell you 80,000 km later I have learnt a little about ADV riding.
You mentioned 250 km to get to and from so that puts you in the ADV bike category. A commen mistake made by most new ADV riders is focusing on dirt capable bikes when fact is that its a rare ride when gravel and pavement are shared equally on a ADV ride. Most common split is 80 % pavement 20 gravel. A guy that puts knobbies on a ADV bike may be smiling on a steep climb but its payback on the 200 km wet pavement ride home🙃 If the intention is to ride only gravel then a thumper dualsport with high profile tires is all that is needed.
Offroad terrain is classed from C trails to A trails. An ADV bike with low profile 80/20 tires starts maxing out at C+ type trails put on high profile knobbies and you may be able to venture into B trails but it will cost you $ in parts ADV bikes are not cheap.
The new 700 - 800cc bikes are look interesting for sure but add another 60lb and you get near double the hp with the 1200s. Best to know the type of riding you will be doing before you spend the coin on something you will trade in after a year. If I traded down to a T7 I would give up the sport touring😔 and focus on FSRs running high profile knobbies.
 

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There are arguably 3 or more sub categories of ADV bike, as well as what I’ll term superADV, big power, essentially street bikes with forest service road capability. My garage has 3 bikes in a category all of which could be considered ADV of sorts, a 30+ year old G/S, essentially the very first of the ADV’s, owned since new,,, a newer 1200GS, happy to run 140-150km all day in comfort,,,and a latest last version of Honda’s XR650L stone axe. All happy to do highway all the way to single track, which I’ve done. But where the XR650L really shows it’s ease of capability in single track mud to the belly, the 1000 and 1200 BMWs revel in tight backroad work pavement with their steering rudder style handlebar, and comfort of 8” suspension. I was on the Green Mtn Road in Penticton yesterday, cannot imagine going on that on a full on sportbike, torture.
One bike cannot possibly do everything great. But ADVs tick more boxes than any other category.
 

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There are arguably 3 or more sub categories of ADV bike, as well as what I’ll term superADV, big power, essentially street bikes with forest service road capability. My garage has 3 bikes in a category all of which could be considered ADV of sorts, a 30+ year old G/S, essentially the very first of the ADV’s, owned since new,,, a newer 1200GS, happy to run 140-150km all day in comfort,,,and a latest last version of Honda’s XR650L stone axe. All happy to do highway all the way to single track, which I’ve done. But where the XR650L really shows it’s ease of capability in single track mud to the belly, the 1000 and 1200 BMWs revel in tight backroad work pavement with their steering rudder style handlebar, and comfort of 8” suspension. I was on the Green Mtn Road in Penticton yesterday, cannot imagine going on that on a full on sportbike, torture.
One bike cannot possibly do everything great. But ADVs tick more boxes than any other category.
I was on Green Mountain road twice yesterday. Scooter and sportbike. Its a handy road with little traffic.
 

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I have been thinking about my next bike and this T7 really seems to tick the boxes. It won't be this year now, it's too late in the season to start with that.. but maybe over the winter pick one up and get it nicely equipped for next year. I'd like to maybe ride this trans canada adventure trail or whatever they call it. Seems like it would be fun.
 
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