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· What? I can't hear you...
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Cost me about $150 bucks to take that engine from not even turning over running perfectly. Would've cost me about 60 if it weren't for a pair of craptastic coils; beyond that all it needed was a pair of rings and a thourough carburetor cleaning. No overbore, no piston, no nothing... two strokes are great for that. Most of the ones I've seen up for sale and described as "running rough/needs mechanical work" would probably run just fine with a good carb cleaning session. As said, if you're not ripping it a new one every time you go out (which is unlikely on a TS200), you should do fine. At the end of the day, there's simply less stuff to screw up/die/go wrong on a two-stroke.

PS: Like your last post said though, TS200's are rare. Finding parts could be a bitch, and nothing sucks more than spending years searching for that one elusive part. The shitty plastic fenders on my Yamaha are proof of that :(
 

· What? I can't hear you...
Joined
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110 Posts
4 strokes 15 years ago were way more reliable and 2 stokes needed new pistons once per year and 4 strokes every 12 years.
What's your opinion on REAL old two strokes? Like 30 year old two strokes... I lucked out with my CT175 as everything was well within tolerances, and I expect my GT250 looks to be in the same shape (low kms), but the PE175 needed a new piston and cylinder. Why? I've always assumed it was just because my older two strokes make more tractable power down low and don't need to be wound out to 9000 rpm to make power. True? False?
 
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