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Discussion Starter #1
So i'm looking into getting my first bike
and was wondering what would be the best bike to get
as far as engine size and handling go ...
i'm 5'7 and 148ilbs and have ridden bikes in the past.
any help would be greatly appreciated!
Thank you :bowdown
 

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West Koots, I'm here....
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Check out the New Rider Q & A section for many answers to your questions.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
i have read most of the stickies,
was just wanting some more personal
preferances from people and what i would be able
to handle according to my weight and height
 

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I'm not a big fan of telling people what they should ride.
Nor am I a proponent of "get a small bike first," assuming they are "easier to handle."
They are not. They may be lighter, however, some of their handling characteristics are atrocious.
After all, did the size of the engine in your first car have that much meaning to you?
The only way to determine what is right for you is to swing a leg over a lot of motorcycles, see if you can get some test rides, and approach people on the sidewalk who get off a motorcycle.
Size doesn't matter.(ladies, please stop laughing......)
(Big inch Harleys, while 700+ pounds, are very docile and easy to handle at parking lot and walking speeds. The "smallest," Harley, the Sportster, is a handful at slow speeds. How do I know? I've ridden them both)
Your weight is immaterial, unless you're considering a 50cc motorcycle, but as you're on BC"sport" bikes, you're considering an "all road," worthy machine.
My recommendation?
Buy something, anything, you think you'll like to ride, and makes for great garage jewellry. Don't spend a lot of money on it. In other words, buy used, for now, and dedicate your efforts and money on proper gear and training. Once you're fully equipped with gear (waterproof gear, you live in Courtney fer cryin' out loud!) and are trained, the motorcycle becomes a tool, and you are better equipped to choose a tool that suits you best.
That worked for me.

The "training and gear first," might work for you too.
 

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I do all my own stunts
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michael said:
I'm not a big fan of telling people what they should ride.
Nor am I a proponent of "get a small bike first," assuming they are "easier to handle."
They are not. They may be lighter, however, some of their handling characteristics are atrocious.
After all, did the size of the engine in your first car have that much meaning to you?
The only way to determine what is right for you is to swing a leg over a lot of motorcycles, see if you can get some test rides, and approach people on the sidewalk who get off a motorcycle.
Size doesn't matter.(ladies, please stop laughing......)
(Big inch Harleys, while 700+ pounds, are very docile and easy to handle at parking lot and walking speeds. The "smallest," Harley, the Sportster, is a handful at slow speeds. How do I know? I've ridden them both)
Your weight is immaterial, unless you're considering a 50cc motorcycle, but as you're on BC"sport" bikes, you're considering an "all road," worthy machine.
My recommendation?
Buy something, anything, you think you'll like to ride, and makes for great garage jewellry. Don't spend a lot of money on it. In other words, buy used, for now, and dedicate your efforts and money on proper gear and training. Once you're fully equipped with gear (waterproof gear, you live in Courtney fer cryin' out loud!) and are trained, the motorcycle becomes a tool, and you are better equipped to choose a tool that suits you best.
That worked for me.

The "training and gear first," might work for you too.

no one says smaller bikes handle better, they have a more predictable power curve, and are more forgiving.

next point, would you learn on a car with 400+ horsepower?? no. And why is that relavant, 110hp to 360pound bike. Power to wight ratio, a 400 hp car, roughly has the same power to wieght ratio...no, you learn on something more forgiving.

Harleys seating postion doesn't compare to a sportbikes seating position, the more upright your back is, the more comfortable you are...what does that mean, less physically demanding, and you guessed it. more forgiving ride to concentrate on making yourself a better, smoother rider.


:thumbup for gear and training, but if you want to learn quick and safely, you'll be a more fogiving bike than one of the new supersports or litre bikes.

get your lessons under your belt, try out some different bikes there, and pic something you like.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
yes i am planning on getting a cheaper used bike because i am sure i will crash a few times and don't want to spend that much money on parts / cosmetics and agreed i will probably buy the gear before i get the bike
and then get lessons aswell.
Thank you i shall also check out the " training and gear first "

and as for bikes i've ridden lotsa dirtbikes n trail bikes and
i doubt this applies very much but i bmx regularly and i have rode my friends dads GSX around the driveway a bit ...
 
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Discussion Starter #11
get a nice early 80s 400 cc bike...there's always a few of those on the market...they usually go for around a grand...
 

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no one says smaller bikes handle better, they have a more predictable power curve, and are more forgiving.
I have to disagree. The feel of a motorcycle is subjective. "Forgiving," is also subjective, and I'll disagree entirely with the "predictable power curve."
A lot of larger engined motorcycles also have a predictable power curve. I think there are too many variables to say they are "forgiving," or "predictable," but I'll be quiet now and read the rest of your well organized post.
next point, would you learn on a car with 400+ horsepower??
You have a good point there, although I suspect the basics of operating an automobile are the same whether you are driving a 3 cylinder Sprint of the '80's, or a 5.0 Mustang.
For me (and only me, our original poster may feel differently) I don't equate more horsepower with less predictable power deliver. I equate it with the ability to accelerate more quickly, and increase the available top speed.
Harleys seating postion doesn't compare to a sportbikes seating position, the more upright your back is, the more comfortable you are
I'll give you half marks on this one.:laughing Harley seating positions (I used them as an example, not the milepost) don't equate to more sporting motorcycles seating position. However, comfort is again, subjective. Some riders with lower back issues are actually more comfortable on a sport bike. That's why the market supports so many diverse motorcycles.
Other than that, I heartily agree with the training in advance of motorcycle choice.
As Reg Pridmore says, "there's more than one way to turn a motorcycle....."
no wait, it's this one, "First you get smooth, then you get fast."
Enjoyed reading your points of view.:thumbup
 

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West Koots, I'm here....
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if you plan to crash, get framesliders or some ratbike
Even if you don't PLAN to crash, as noone actually plans to do this, you should get a bike without all the fancy plastic bodywork,etc.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
yes it won't be anything that fancy for sure
and i will probably get frame sliders if i have enough money after getting
the gear and bike
and i took at look at some bikes from the 80's
any thoughts on them would help alot,thank you once again.

89 honda CB 1 or
88 honda hawk GT
83 honda NS
87 kawasaki GPZ
85 suzuki GSX
82 ducati pantah
88 yamaha FZR
 

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A friend of mine has an '89 CB1 and loves it. Its small, light and should be easy to learn on. The clutch action on this bike is a no-brainer...i.e. easy to learn.

Hawk GT would be my personal choice outta those listed. Being a twin is a big plus in my books. check out adrenalin in Victoria..they have a nice one for sale.

Good luck on your search. Buy something you want for your reasons...can't say that enough.

www.adrenalinmotorlcycle.com
 

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West Koots, I'm here....
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My choices of the bikes listed would be the hawk, gpz (if a domestic model), cb1, and fzr400 (if a domestic model). Stay away from "grey market" bikes, as parts can be hard to get, and I would not recommend the ducati either, for the same reason.
 

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bunkbedorgy said:
yes it won't be anything that fancy for sure
and i will probably get frame sliders if i have enough money after getting
the gear and bike
and i took at look at some bikes from the 80's
any thoughts on them would help alot,thank you once again.

89 honda CB 1 or
88 honda hawk GT
83 honda NS
87 kawasaki GPZ
85 suzuki GSX
82 ducati pantah
88 yamaha FZR
And I can't believe that I'm the first moderator to see this and move it to the beginner section... :D

:flip Welcome aboard bunkbedorgy :flip

Of the bikes in the list the CB1 and Hawk both enjoy a bit of a cult following so they may be hard to find and WILL be expensive when you do find one. The GPZ would make a nice beginner bike but parts are going to take longer to get and the bikes are often going to need a lot of work on them before they are safely ridable. See my thread stickied at the top of the beginner forum for "So.. you want to buy an older bike" for some of the issues. Ducati Pantah will be VERY hard to get parts for and expensive to boot. Forget this one except as a second project bike. Same for the Honds NS.

Far better to stick with more recent bikes such as the Ninja 500, Suzuki GS500 and perhaps one of the older 600 sport bikes from the early to mid 90's. Honda 600F2's and 600F3's would make a nice first sportbike. Especially with your dirt riding background behind you.

Some more info would also help. How much do you have to spend and truly what sort of riding will you be doing with this bike? General hacking around town, country road rides in the hills, touring, racing or other?

The best beginner bikes listed in the sticky thread are viable for you as well. Those bikes were listed for lots of good reasons. There's no one best bike. For all I know you are rich enough and patient enough to deal with the issues of the Pantah and that may well be a great option for you. Only YOU are in the best position to know that though.
 

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S2S anyone?
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i've got a honda 599, looking to sell it,
I started last year, very easy bike to learn on. Tons of power, good seat height. good handling characteristics.

I suggest a honda 599 or SV650.

Adam.
 
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