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Hi i was wondering what is a suitable motorcycle for a newbie. Now i know bcsbers are watching out for the newbies so i won't even mention the Rs or the RRs. But what make or displacement is suitable for a newbie. As long as it's below 600?
 

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Life is Good!
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Hi i was wondering what is a suitable motorcycle for a newbie. Now i know bcsbers are watching out for the newbies so i won't even mention the Rs or the RRs. But what make or displacement is suitable for a newbie. As long as it's below 600?
Well.... If you want a newer bike I would suggest either a Suzuki GS 500 or a Kawasaki Ninja EX 500.

But I would read the stickies, this topic is beat to death already !!!

click here ---------> http://bcsportbikes.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11294
 

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how new are you? a total noob? or had experience with other smaller bikes before

i'm a noob to sportbikes.... 600 rr for me is just perfect, has enough power for me to grow....
 

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Life is Good!
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I dont know what Klutch r and weitaro are smoking but totally ignore what they said !!!

R1 ? I hope you are joking !!!

CBR RR... to much maintenance cost ? lol this is the furthest from the truth !!!

read that sticky that I linked to you in my first reply
 

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a noob who can't ride
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I dont know what Klutch r and weitaro are smoking but totally ignore what they said !!!

R1 ? I hope you are joking !!!

CBR RR... to much maintenance cost ? lol this is the furthest from the truth !!!

read that sticky that I linked to you in my first reply

...try comparing it to my 250c.c. single cylinder bike

neways.. yea read the sticky! it helped me when i was purchasing my 1st bike
 

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Fuelled by rice
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mid 90's 600's are a good starter. If you want newer, I would go with a suzuki gs500 or kawasaki ex500. depends on your size and comfort
 

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Crotch Rocket Scientist
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Let's see.....

1. take a motorcycle safety course or be dead.
2. you are going to drop your first bike. It's a given. It will happen regardless of what you buy and how careful you are. Buy an older, smaller displacement bike until you get some experience.
3. Take the safety course or end up as road pizza.
4. Ensure that you have complete gear and a NEW helmet sized appropriately.
5. Read the stickies.
6. Take a motorcycle safety course or ensure that your dental records are up to date.
 

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100% Asshole
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Let's see.....

1. take a motorcycle safety course or be dead.
2. you are going to drop your first bike. It's a given. It will happen regardless of what you buy and how careful you are. Buy an older, smaller displacement bike until you get some experience.
3. Take the safety course or end up as road pizza.
4. Ensure that you have complete gear and a NEW helmet sized appropriately.
5. Read the stickies.
6. Take a motorcycle safety course or ensure that your dental records are up to date.
Pretty much sums it up....................
 

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All good points.
Personally, I don't there it's that important what model, or displacement motorcycle to buy.
What is important is:
Is this the suitable motorcycle *for you?*
You may be the type that is comfortable on a cruise, or perhaps a UJM, or sport bike.
You really must find a motorcycle that you feel comfortable on, and that eases the learning curve.
Yes, it may be easier to learn on a 125cc motorcycle, but that isn't suitable for forays onto some roads around Vancouver.
Get something that fits you, in any configuration.
Buy good gear, you are going to use it,a nd likely keep it through a variety of motorcycles.
Most motorcyclists tastes change over time, so what you think you need now, may be proven to be less than perfect, a year, or two from now. Spend more money than you think you should on good quality gear. Spend 'till it hurts, 'cause it's easier to spend money, than heal with regrets.
Think of where you ride. Vancouver is wet country, and you most certainly be caught out in the rain. I recommend buying waterproof boots, and riding gear for a start. You will not regret this.
This is a great sport, a fun one. It has the ability to change peoples lives.
Enjoy!
 

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2. you are going to drop your first bike. It's a given. It will happen regardless of what you buy and how careful you are.
Not always true. Don't ride around wondering when you're going to drop it.

If you only really plan to ride around town, go for a supermoto! :thumbup Or maybe an SV650. The SV is a great all round bike. Good for beginners and good for road trips if you so desire.

;D
 

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Vindicated
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SV650 is a good bike.. I have one for sale depending how much you want to spend. It's good for beginners because it's forgiving but it also gives you room to grow into it, you're not going to be tired of that bike very quickly.
 

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Crotch Rocket Scientist
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I'd guess that while dropping your bike is not a complete certainty, it's close enough to 100% - and really that would include any sort of damage a new rider would inflict on their bike.

I guess my point there is to recommend to a new rider not to get a bike that's going to cost $3000 to repair if you do drop it.

I dropped my first bike in a very embarrassing fashion (small collie running towards me while I was doing a u-turn in a narrow alley and I pinched the front disc and put it down slowly) but my bike was old skool and didn't suffer any damage except for a bent brake lever.

If someone has a lot of dirt bike experience before going to road bikes then they'll be a lot less likely to do something odd and put it down - but it does still happen.
 

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myside.yourside.myside
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I am not the seller, but this is about the best starter bike/gear combo deal I have seen in a long time

http://www.bcsportbikes.com/forum/showthread.php?t=79577
You know sometimes you see the last poster, and you've read the thread so you know what it's about, and you're like "ooooh I bet adam112 let loose with some good ol wit & sarcasm, let's see..."

and then you see calm, friendly and even useful advice

bit of a letdown

:(

Cory

PS: I learned on a yamaha maxim 400 which I paid $500 for (I think it was a 84) and I would recommend that as a learning bike to anyone. 'course I have no idea what the present day equivalent would be
 

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That's not an R6. It's the YZF600R. More like a VFR. Think sporty looks with touring comfort (compared to today's 600's).

I would have no problem recommending that as a learning street bike.
 
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