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mostly accurate for todays offerings. I believe sportrider magazine still releases test settings when they do a bike review so if you're
within specs for rider it was designed for you should be okay making small adjustments to suit your specific needs.



i will agree when in certain circumstances and depending on how often you switch bikes it is very affordable to just have it done with proper measurements and an experienced eye to boot..

i do believe once i get all the goodies on my set of current bikes, i'll be visiting one of our local talent to help me get 'em both dialed in & on the ball :2cents
I am just getting Suspension upgrade tips via text from an infamous semi-local track rat. *Bike is at Rod's and parts to be ordered ASAP. Because I need it set up perfectly as it sits on stands throughout the winter .....
 

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Found this on a forum today, thought I'd share:





Usually located on top of the fork in the center of the preload adjuster. Controls the extension of the fork after it compresses. Screw in for firmer/ quicker extension and out for softer/ slower extension. Use a screwdriver to adjust. Turn in all the way and then turn out and listen for the clicks. If you have a ten-way adjustment it will have ten clicks. First click out, firmest setting, tenth click out, softest.
If you don't have any adjustment you can alter the firmness by the weight of the shock oil. You can also adjust the firmness by changing the springs inside the fork. You should adjust the front fork preload, rebound, and compression settings equally/ by the same percent or close to it, if you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing. Always make sure the right and left fork are adjusted exactly equal.

Fork Preload:

Located on top of the fork and can be adjusted using a socket or wrench. Preload is the amount you compress the front fork spring from its normal state. The more preload/ the more you compress the spring. The stiffer the fork becomes. The preload adjustment settings can be seen by the circular rings or marks. If you have a five-way adjustment it will have five marks. One mark showing is the stiffest setting. Five marks showing is the softest setting. Preload adjustments generally make the most noticeable change to the front fork stiffness or the amount the bike dips forward under heavy braking.

Fork Compression Damping

If you have this adjustment it is usually located at the bottom of fork. It controls the compression of the fork when it hits a bump. Screw in for firmer/ slower compression and out for softer/ faster compression. Use a screwdriver to adjust. Turn in all the way and then turn out and listen for the clicks. If you have a ten-way adjustment it will have ten clicks. First click out, firmest setting, tenth click out, softest.
Not all bikes have this adjustment, and some have it linked to the rebound damping. You should adjust the front fork preload, rebound, and compression settings equally/ by the same percent or close to it, if you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing. Always make sure the right and left fork are adjusted exactly equal.

Rear Compression Damping

Instead of at the bottom of the shock like the front forks, the rear compression damping adjustment will be at the top of the rear shock. It will be on a remote reservoir connected to the top of the shock like the photo to the left. It may also be connected by a hose and the reservoir located under the seat or slightly above and to the side of the rear shock.
It controls the compression of the rear when it hits a bump. Screw in for firmer/ slower compression and out for softer/ faster compression. Use a screwdriver to adjust. Turn in all the way and then turn out and listen for the clicks. If you have a ten-way adjustment it will have ten clicks. First click out, firmest setting, tenth click out, softest. You should adjust the rear preload, rebound, and compression settings equally/ by the same percent or close to it, if you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing.

Rear Preload

Adjusting the rear preload will usually make the biggest difference in the handling of your bike. Unfortunately it is also the most difficult adjustment to make to the rear suspension. The rear preload is the amount the rear spring is pre -compressed. The tighter the spring is compressed, the stiffer the rear suspension becomes, and the higher the rear end of the bike will sit. This rear height change will put more of the bikes weight on the front, affecting the handling. To adjust the rear preload you will need a C-spanner which is a large C shaped wrench. You can use a hammer and punch or dowel, but this may damage the adjustment ring nuts. First loosen the top ring nut separating it from the bottom ring nut. Now you can tighten and loosen or move the bottom ring nut up and down. Up will decrease/ soften the preload and down will increase/ stiffen the preload. Once you have the bottom ring nut where you want it, tighten the top ring nut to the bottom. Be careful not to over tighten the ring nuts together and strip them. Small adjustments to the rear preload will make a big difference. If you do not have two ring nuts for adjustments you may have a metal ring located above the spring on the shock, that has step adjustments on the ring. To adjust this you may first have to loosen a locking screw on the ring if there is one. Then move the ring to the left or right to adjust the preload. Remember to tighten the locking screw.


Rear Rebound Damping

Usually located on the bottom of the rear shock unlike the front fork adjustment. Controls the extension of the shock after it compresses. Screw in for firmer/ quicker extension and out for softer/ slower extension. Use a screwdriver to adjust. Turn in all the way and then turn out and listen for the clicks. If you have a ten-way adjustment it will have ten clicks. First click out, firmest setting, tenth click out, softest. Some bikes have a knob that you turn left or right to make the adjustment, but it still makes clicks. You should adjust the rear preload, rebound, and compression settings equally/ by the same percent or close to it, if you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing.

Rear Ride Height Adjustment

Some bikes will have a rear ride height adjustment. It may be a screw coming out of the top of the rear shock, like in the photo to the left, or it may be a screw coming out of the bottom of the rear shock. Both adjust in a similar way. If you adjust the ride height of the bike you will also change the weight distribution of the bike. Raising the rear will put more weight on the front. This will cause the bike to turn in quicker or easier, but can make the rear unstable or cause tank slappers. If you notice these negative side effects increasing the front preload may be the solution. A raised rear, weight forward adjustment is usually best for track situations, but not everyday riding, so they say. To adjust the rear ride height loosen the nut on the bolt farthest away from the shock. Then adjust the closer nut raising or lowering the rear. Finally tighten the farther nut.
You can also adjust the ride height by lowering the front triple clamps on the front forks. However that is fairly more difficult, and should only be done by someone who knows what they are doing. Since a very small adjustment up front can make a huge difference.

Static Sag - Suspension Travel

This is a way of adjusting your suspension by measuring the amount it compresses with the full weight of the rider on it. Your front and rear suspension should sag an equal amount. The general rule is that your sag should take up the first third of your suspension travel.


Front and rear preload are the two main adjustments in this technique to get the correct sag. Then dial in the other adjustments for fine-tuning. Some people swear by this technique even though it's a pain. Just follow the instructions below.

1. Put on the gear you normally ride in to get the weight correct.
2. Find two friends to help you measure and hold the bike.
3. Without you on the bike, extend the front fork completely. Measure to the seal wiper to the triple clamp, or to the axel clamp for an inverted fork. This measurement is "S1"
4. Sit on the bike in your normal riding position with your feet on the pegs. Have your friend hold the bike from the rear vertical/ centered. Now have your other friend push down on the front forks, let go and let the forks extend slowly. Take the same measurement you took above again. This measurement is "S2"
5. Finally have your friend at the front of the bike pull up on the forks, let go, and then settle slowly. Once again take the same measurement you took above. This measurement is "S3"
6. Now calculate the sag using this formula "Sag=S1- (S3+S2)/2" Confused? If not repeat the above steps for the rear sag, taking your measurements from the rear axle to a point directly above.


Common Suspension/ Handling Problems

Your Bike Bottoms Out



Symptoms: When you brake hard into a turn or at a stoplight the front end seems to dive down or bottoms out. You accelerate hard and the front of the bike rises up and the back squats down, like a boat. Entering a turn at speed the back or front of the bike feels like it drops significantly and then becomes unstable when get back on the gas. When you hit a bump you get an extreme double bounce from the front and then the back.


Solution: You need more preload. If you notice the symptoms on the front increase the front preload, if the rear, rear preload. Do one at a time and then test it out. One out of adjustment can give the feel of both being out. When you change the preload adjustments you will also be affecting the bikes ride height, which will affect the handling. So if you stiffen the front preload and not the back, the front of your bike will raise. This will cause you to notice that the bike doesn't turn into the turns as easily as before. To correct this and keep the same rear preload adjust the rear ride height or lower the front by raising the fork tubes in the triple clamps. Adjusting the front ride height by the triple clamps can be tricky and needs to be done in very small increment, 4mm at a time or so.


Your Bike Feels Bouncy



Symptoms: It's a sport bike but it feels more like a Goldwing. Your suspension is soft and comfy, but feels bouncy. When you get into the twisties the bike has a floating feeling that makes road feedback vague at high speeds. The bike seems to bend in the middle.


Solution: Increase/ stiffen the rebound damping to dissipate the increased bump forces at higher speeds. Adjust the front and the rear independently, testing the changes as you go.


Your Bike Has A Rough Feeling Ride



Symptoms: When your bike goes over rough road it doesn't seem to absorb the bumps at all. Bumps seem to hit the bike hard and quick, like a pothole. After riding for a while you’re sore because your bike isn't properly absorbing the bumps it’s passing them on to you.


Solution: You should first try and reduce rear compression damping. In bad cases your overall setup may be too stiff and you should reduce compression and rebound damping both.


Your Bike Under steers Or Feels Vague



Symptoms: When exiting a turn you start to get back on the throttle and the front tends to slid or wash out. On slightly uneven or bumpy roads the front tire feedback goes away and the returns for a second just to go away again. The steering may also feel a bit heavy.


Solution: Reduce front fork preload. The front tire is not moving down fast enough and the ride height is probably to high up front. Reducing preload will lower the front and let the forks expand quicker.


You Bikes Bars Violently Twitch Back And Forth - A Tankslapper!



Symptoms: When accelerating the front wheel shakes back and forth quickly. In extreme cases the bars can almost pull out of your hands or if you hold on tight throw you back and forth on the bike and then cause the back to skip left and right. This is a tankslapper. The bars might also twitch mid-corner or feel unstable on turn in. The bike turns into corners to easily.


Solution: Increase front fork preload or lower the rear ride height. You have too much weight on the front tire.


Your Bikes Rear End Feels Wiggly, Or Breaks Loose Easily

Symptoms: You get on the brakes hard for that tight left hander and the back tire skids or wiggles side to side.


Solution: Increase front fork rebound and preload. You could also lower the rear ride height slightly



Your Back Tire Feels Like It's Flat



Symptoms: Your rear tire feels vague or like it has a slight side-to-side wiggle, similar to a flat rear tire. You've checked your air pressure and it's not low.
 

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this last statement sounds a little funny :p
That's cuz I was being ironical.*

Holy crap Chia, that's a ton of information. It will take a while to dig through but at first glance seems pretty decent. *
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Totally useless graphic..........., won't turn in, go straight, bike crashes. There is nothing to adjust......:-0)
 

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Found this on a forum today, thought I'd share:





Usually located on top of the fork in the center of the preload adjuster. Controls the extension of the fork after it compresses. Screw in for firmer/ quicker extension and out for softer/ slower extension. Use a screwdriver to adjust. Turn in all the way and then turn out and listen for the clicks. If you have a ten-way adjustment it will have ten clicks. First click out, firmest setting, tenth click out, softest.
If you don't have any adjustment you can alter the firmness by the weight of the shock oil. You can also adjust the firmness by changing the springs inside the fork. You should adjust the front fork preload, rebound, and compression settings equally/ by the same percent or close to it, if you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing. Always make sure the right and left fork are adjusted exactly equal.

Fork Preload:

Located on top of the fork and can be adjusted using a socket or wrench. Preload is the amount you compress the front fork spring from its normal state. The more preload/ the more you compress the spring. The stiffer the fork becomes. The preload adjustment settings can be seen by the circular rings or marks. If you have a five-way adjustment it will have five marks. One mark showing is the stiffest setting. Five marks showing is the softest setting. Preload adjustments generally make the most noticeable change to the front fork stiffness or the amount the bike dips forward under heavy braking.

Fork Compression Damping

If you have this adjustment it is usually located at the bottom of fork. It controls the compression of the fork when it hits a bump. Screw in for firmer/ slower compression and out for softer/ faster compression. Use a screwdriver to adjust. Turn in all the way and then turn out and listen for the clicks. If you have a ten-way adjustment it will have ten clicks. First click out, firmest setting, tenth click out, softest.
Not all bikes have this adjustment, and some have it linked to the rebound damping. You should adjust the front fork preload, rebound, and compression settings equally/ by the same percent or close to it, if you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing. Always make sure the right and left fork are adjusted exactly equal.

Rear Compression Damping

Instead of at the bottom of the shock like the front forks, the rear compression damping adjustment will be at the top of the rear shock. It will be on a remote reservoir connected to the top of the shock like the photo to the left. It may also be connected by a hose and the reservoir located under the seat or slightly above and to the side of the rear shock.
It controls the compression of the rear when it hits a bump. Screw in for firmer/ slower compression and out for softer/ faster compression. Use a screwdriver to adjust. Turn in all the way and then turn out and listen for the clicks. If you have a ten-way adjustment it will have ten clicks. First click out, firmest setting, tenth click out, softest. You should adjust the rear preload, rebound, and compression settings equally/ by the same percent or close to it, if you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing.

Rear Preload

Adjusting the rear preload will usually make the biggest difference in the handling of your bike. Unfortunately it is also the most difficult adjustment to make to the rear suspension. The rear preload is the amount the rear spring is pre -compressed. The tighter the spring is compressed, the stiffer the rear suspension becomes, and the higher the rear end of the bike will sit. This rear height change will put more of the bikes weight on the front, affecting the handling. To adjust the rear preload you will need a C-spanner which is a large C shaped wrench. You can use a hammer and punch or dowel, but this may damage the adjustment ring nuts. First loosen the top ring nut separating it from the bottom ring nut. Now you can tighten and loosen or move the bottom ring nut up and down. Up will decrease/ soften the preload and down will increase/ stiffen the preload. Once you have the bottom ring nut where you want it, tighten the top ring nut to the bottom. Be careful not to over tighten the ring nuts together and strip them. Small adjustments to the rear preload will make a big difference. If you do not have two ring nuts for adjustments you may have a metal ring located above the spring on the shock, that has step adjustments on the ring. To adjust this you may first have to loosen a locking screw on the ring if there is one. Then move the ring to the left or right to adjust the preload. Remember to tighten the locking screw.


Rear Rebound Damping

Usually located on the bottom of the rear shock unlike the front fork adjustment. Controls the extension of the shock after it compresses. Screw in for firmer/ quicker extension and out for softer/ slower extension. Use a screwdriver to adjust. Turn in all the way and then turn out and listen for the clicks. If you have a ten-way adjustment it will have ten clicks. First click out, firmest setting, tenth click out, softest. Some bikes have a knob that you turn left or right to make the adjustment, but it still makes clicks. You should adjust the rear preload, rebound, and compression settings equally/ by the same percent or close to it, if you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing.

Rear Ride Height Adjustment

Some bikes will have a rear ride height adjustment. It may be a screw coming out of the top of the rear shock, like in the photo to the left, or it may be a screw coming out of the bottom of the rear shock. Both adjust in a similar way. If you adjust the ride height of the bike you will also change the weight distribution of the bike. Raising the rear will put more weight on the front. This will cause the bike to turn in quicker or easier, but can make the rear unstable or cause tank slappers. If you notice these negative side effects increasing the front preload may be the solution. A raised rear, weight forward adjustment is usually best for track situations, but not everyday riding, so they say. To adjust the rear ride height loosen the nut on the bolt farthest away from the shock. Then adjust the closer nut raising or lowering the rear. Finally tighten the farther nut.
You can also adjust the ride height by lowering the front triple clamps on the front forks. However that is fairly more difficult, and should only be done by someone who knows what they are doing. Since a very small adjustment up front can make a huge difference.

Static Sag - Suspension Travel

This is a way of adjusting your suspension by measuring the amount it compresses with the full weight of the rider on it. Your front and rear suspension should sag an equal amount. The general rule is that your sag should take up the first third of your suspension travel.


Front and rear preload are the two main adjustments in this technique to get the correct sag. Then dial in the other adjustments for fine-tuning. Some people swear by this technique even though it's a pain. Just follow the instructions below.

1. Put on the gear you normally ride in to get the weight correct.
2. Find two friends to help you measure and hold the bike.
3. Without you on the bike, extend the front fork completely. Measure to the seal wiper to the triple clamp, or to the axel clamp for an inverted fork. This measurement is "S1"
4. Sit on the bike in your normal riding position with your feet on the pegs. Have your friend hold the bike from the rear vertical/ centered. Now have your other friend push down on the front forks, let go and let the forks extend slowly. Take the same measurement you took above again. This measurement is "S2"
5. Finally have your friend at the front of the bike pull up on the forks, let go, and then settle slowly. Once again take the same measurement you took above. This measurement is "S3"
6. Now calculate the sag using this formula "Sag=S1- (S3+S2)/2" Confused? If not repeat the above steps for the rear sag, taking your measurements from the rear axle to a point directly above.


Common Suspension/ Handling Problems

Your Bike Bottoms Out



Symptoms: When you brake hard into a turn or at a stoplight the front end seems to dive down or bottoms out. You accelerate hard and the front of the bike rises up and the back squats down, like a boat. Entering a turn at speed the back or front of the bike feels like it drops significantly and then becomes unstable when get back on the gas. When you hit a bump you get an extreme double bounce from the front and then the back.


Solution: You need more preload. If you notice the symptoms on the front increase the front preload, if the rear, rear preload. Do one at a time and then test it out. One out of adjustment can give the feel of both being out. When you change the preload adjustments you will also be affecting the bikes ride height, which will affect the handling. So if you stiffen the front preload and not the back, the front of your bike will raise. This will cause you to notice that the bike doesn't turn into the turns as easily as before. To correct this and keep the same rear preload adjust the rear ride height or lower the front by raising the fork tubes in the triple clamps. Adjusting the front ride height by the triple clamps can be tricky and needs to be done in very small increment, 4mm at a time or so.


Your Bike Feels Bouncy



Symptoms: It's a sport bike but it feels more like a Goldwing. Your suspension is soft and comfy, but feels bouncy. When you get into the twisties the bike has a floating feeling that makes road feedback vague at high speeds. The bike seems to bend in the middle.


Solution: Increase/ stiffen the rebound damping to dissipate the increased bump forces at higher speeds. Adjust the front and the rear independently, testing the changes as you go.


Your Bike Has A Rough Feeling Ride



Symptoms: When your bike goes over rough road it doesn't seem to absorb the bumps at all. Bumps seem to hit the bike hard and quick, like a pothole. After riding for a while you’re sore because your bike isn't properly absorbing the bumps it’s passing them on to you.


Solution: You should first try and reduce rear compression damping. In bad cases your overall setup may be too stiff and you should reduce compression and rebound damping both.


Your Bike Under steers Or Feels Vague



Symptoms: When exiting a turn you start to get back on the throttle and the front tends to slid or wash out. On slightly uneven or bumpy roads the front tire feedback goes away and the returns for a second just to go away again. The steering may also feel a bit heavy.


Solution: Reduce front fork preload. The front tire is not moving down fast enough and the ride height is probably to high up front. Reducing preload will lower the front and let the forks expand quicker.


You Bikes Bars Violently Twitch Back And Forth - A Tankslapper!



Symptoms: When accelerating the front wheel shakes back and forth quickly. In extreme cases the bars can almost pull out of your hands or if you hold on tight throw you back and forth on the bike and then cause the back to skip left and right. This is a tankslapper. The bars might also twitch mid-corner or feel unstable on turn in. The bike turns into corners to easily.


Solution: Increase front fork preload or lower the rear ride height. You have too much weight on the front tire.


Your Bikes Rear End Feels Wiggly, Or Breaks Loose Easily

Symptoms: You get on the brakes hard for that tight left hander and the back tire skids or wiggles side to side.


Solution: Increase front fork rebound and preload. You could also lower the rear ride height slightly



Your Back Tire Feels Like It's Flat



Symptoms: Your rear tire feels vague or like it has a slight side-to-side wiggle, similar to a flat rear tire. You've checked your air pressure and it's not low.
Holy B40 flowchart.
 

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I'm at a crossroads. I have spoken with people in the know and am still torn ........

The bike is a VFR1200. Factory suspension is absolutely terrible. Undersprung with no adjustability barely describes how poor it is. Whoever was responsible for this aspect of the bike should be sweeping the parking lot of the factory these days.

There is an Ohlins S46HR1C1S going on the back, that's a no-brainer. The front is where my problem is.

My choices are cartridge kits or a revalve and respring. Traxxion Dynamics has a 20 mm cartridge kit that will run about $1500. If I were a rich man I could let GP Suspension relieve me of $2400 for a full on, 25 mm, bells and whistles set up ...... but rich I am not. A revalve and respring will run me around $900. On my old Tuono, I had an Ohlins SS revalve and respring kit installed which was phenomenal, but that was on a better fork to begin with.

Input or opinions?
 

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I'm at a crossroads. I have spoken with people in the know and am still torn ........

The bike is a VFR1200. Factory suspension is absolutely terrible. Undersprung with no adjustability barely describes how poor it is. Whoever was responsible for this aspect of the bike should be sweeping the parking lot of the factory these days.

There is an Ohlins S46HR1C1S going on the back, that's a no-brainer. The front is where my problem is.

My choices are cartridge kits or a revalve and respring. Traxxion Dynamics has a 20 mm cartridge kit that will run about $1500. If I were a rich man I could let GP Suspension relieve me of $2400 for a full on, 25 mm, bells and whistles set up ...... but rich I am not. A revalve and respring will run me around $900. On my old Tuono, I had an Ohlins SS revalve and respring kit installed which was phenomenal, but that was on a better fork to begin with.

Input or opinions?
Update new shock in back and just get heavier springs up front. Worry about balancing later if need be.

The difference with those 2 items will be huge.
 

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Update new shock in back and just get heavier springs up front. Worry about balancing later if need be.

The difference with those 2 items will be huge.
Shortly after I posed my question, I got a call from Rod. I swung by and he gave me a rundown of the fork internals on my bike.

The springs were measured and are 9.5's, correct sizing for me and the bike. The rebound valve was easily disassembled and the shim stack rebuilt with heaver shim stack built up. He took the time to pull me into the back, show the difference between the OEM stack buildup and what he was putting in and explain how things worked. I repeatedly asked if there was more that could be done, practically begging to spend money. New springs? I can wait! Ohlins valving? Look, you have a set here! What about magic unicorn milk gathered by tiny forest elves? He said that this should do the trick and more didn't really need to be done.

Now when I go to the doctor and she recommends a course of action, I don't keep arguing with her to do more. When I see a lawyer, I don't tell him to crank up his billable hours to me. When I order a pizza, I don't tell the cook how to do his job. Based on the totality of the situation, I trust in most peoples ability to do their job competently. Rod has proven himself more than capable in the past, I have faith in his choices.

I can update on results once the shock goes on and all is adjusted. But with these temperatures and weather, that new suspension will not be tested too hard or else I'll be posting a question for places that do good motorcycle repair work.
 

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one thing i learned very early on when fvcking around with suspension is this.. The pros know what is what in terms of oem and aftermarket,
I was always surprised when looking at the two side by side and slowly coming to terms with the simple fact that all these goodies do exactly
what they're supposed to as long as they're properly matched to your riding weight and style. The Thermosman fixed one major flaw in the
Ohlins valving kit i got my r1, and he did it for FREE!! sent me a set of backplate shims which i slapped on during regular maintenance over winter.

He did the same thing you mentioned over the phone, stating the little differences in shim stack back to back with what came in the oem forks vs what the Ohlins kit offered.

I think the biggest item I had to work on came in the form of proper spacers to make up the gap aftermarket springs left in the forks, my machinist whipped them up over a weekend
and boy oh boy, it made such a huge difference i just could not stop grinning from ear to ear when i took her for a good ride. I redid the shim stack on the shock to match RaceTech specifications as well.

the only real reason i went with aftermarket valving was the precise machining done on the valve itself, shim work will fix little hiccups more times than not for yer average mortal :D
 

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I'm in the same boat, looks like Honda's built a bike for the rest of us (easy electronic suspension adjustment on the fly)*
 

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I'm in the same boat, looks like Honda's built a bike for the rest of us (easy electronic suspension adjustment on the fly)
take it with a grain of salt, if its anything like the R1M then you may not be as happy as you would think.
I have it on good account from a mate of mine down under, he's owned many bikes and he was not all that impressed.

It offers a bit of a flighty front end feel, the electronics create a vagueness that is hard to pin down n' its not too confidence inducing.
If you were to use it on the track he said you'd go 2 laps just to get a 'feel' for it and accept what changes it suggests then turn the thing off..

so really if you were to do measurements yourself, take it around the track twice n' you are likely to end up at the same results..
its only really useful if you frequent several tracks, to help suss it out without wasting too much track time; but once you're where you're happy its just extra weight..
 

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Well if that one guy doesnt like it, it must not be any good..... lol
i figured thats how some would take it.. i've known him for many years and respect his opinion.. specially since ive heard the same regarding the Ducati multistrada which came with sky-hook suspension..

its not like its really electronic suspension.. it uses motors to make adjustments on the same controls you n' I use today, semi-active.. Turn that off and its just plain jane suspension, what we know to work very well.

Front end feel is hugely important to me, may not be the same for all.. last thing i need is a flighty front end with vague response.. Kinda like driving an automatic vs std i guess?

point is, yeh there is a learning curve to suspension, but even with electronic suspension you're still looking at OEM versions of an aftermarket component.
once you learn to tune your suspension are you really gonna sit there and constantly make adjustments? how bad are the roads where you ride?


sure put your money into Ohlins, but dont count on a motor making little adjustments to replace 'sliced bread' :coffee
 

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OMG......when was the last time you did a track day?
god's got fvck all to do with it..

but then thats the go to question on bcsb i guess. With all due respect some of us have a clue or two about whats going on believe it or not :laughing


when was the last time you rode a TRIAL bike or competed on one? it may seem a ludicrous question but thats the world i come from; and i was damn good at it :thumbup

road / track bikes suspension setup is a little different of course but front end feel is not something you need to be doing mach2 to understand.
i would think having a less than ideal surface to ride on will show how badly off your front end handles. I felt the difference between oem and my Ohlins kit
after about 3 corners. Not rocket science. But none of this has much to do with what is being said above.

Electronically controlled semi-active suspension tries to make little damping adjustments as you ride, as the computer figures out ideal damping for
you, the way it has been explained to me, causes a bit of a vague response from the front end. Turn off semi-active damping and leave damping
where its at and that vague feel completely goes away.. When you hear the same story from 3-4 experienced riders both on the track and street
you kinda take notice. In terms of the Multistrada 1200 i would assume since the forks have more travel than our sportbikes the end result is a bit of a 'flighty front end'.

the line you should be looking at from a few posts above is.. 'TAKE IT WITH A GRAIN OF SALT'; it may not be what you think you need, n' then again since you like track days so much, maybe it is? :spinsmile

I have not heard the same negative comments regarding the rear shock running a similar semi-active damping adjustment.
 

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god's got fvck all to do with it..

but then thats the go to question on bcsb i guess. With all due respect some of us have a clue or two about whats going on believe it or not :laughing

when was the last time you rode a TRIAL bike or competed on one? it may seem a ludicrous question but thats the world i come from; and i was damn good at it :thumbup

road / track bikes suspension setup is a little different of course but front end feel is not something you need to be doing mach2 to understand.
i would think having a less than ideal surface to ride on will show how badly off your front end handles. I felt the difference between oem and my Ohlins kit
after about 3 corners. Not rocket science. But none of this has much to do with what is being said above.

Electronically controlled semi-active suspension tries to make little damping adjustments as you ride, as the computer figures out ideal damping for
you, the way it has been explained to me, causes a bit of a vague response from the front end. Turn off semi-active damping and leave damping
where its at and that vague feel completely goes away.. When you hear the same story from 3-4 experienced riders both on the track and street
you kinda take notice. In terms of the Multistrada 1200 i would assume since the forks have more travel than our sportbikes the end result is a bit of a 'flighty front end'.

the line you should be looking at from a few posts above is.. 'TAKE IT WITH A GRAIN OF SALT'; it may not be what you think you need, n' then again since you like track days so much, maybe it is? :spinsmile

I have not heard the same negative comments regarding the rear shock running a similar semi-active damping adjustment.

I'm not "in the know", but my guess would be the suspension learnings and practice/applications of a trials bike vs a supersport are not at all transferable.

Again, I don't know this, but having seen both types of riding, and my feelings are they share little in common outside of 2 wheels, seems a strange comparison.
 

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I'm not "in the know", but my guess would be the suspension learnings and practice/applications of a trials bike vs a supersport are not at all transferable.
you are somewhat correct of course as far as how the two styles of bikes are used. It was meant as a snarky remark knowing the answer, I wouldnt have asked if it was Bandito posting :coffee

1st rule of being an asshole online, know your audience :cool

at the end of the day though, suspension and damping adjustments are very similar, and what actually makes up the suspension components is exactly the same across the board.

knowledge gained from one or the other is DIRECTLY transferable if you got a few marbles still rattling around upstairs.

point is, I've been at this for a fvcking long time, competed for Trials 6 years and ridden several different Trials, Cruisers, sportbikes alike.. Suspension is suspension.

guess what the 1st thing i found when i rode cruisers? front end feel is lacking when compared to a sportbike. imagine that? i figured it all out by myself and didnt need a track..
 
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