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H2O Turbo Fitness
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Discussion Starter #1
I saw the thread about the SV1000 vs. the VTR, but I'm not interested in the VTR (especially after reading the thread... and the age of the thread lol). I grew out of my 2001 SV650 last summer, but wanted to give it an extra season and yep - a few local rides and a 1k+ road trip later in the last couple weeks and I'm starting to look for my next bike.

So post 'em up, what you think, what you have, articles, threads, pics - the more information I have the better! :thumbup
*Do note that although the newer R1s are sweet, I've test ridden a few different bikes (including the R1) and just can't bring myself to ride an inline four... yet.
 

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Having ridden both, it's really a toss up on what you really need and what can you afford. While I like the V4 sound and power delivery of the VFR, the issues with owning a Honda far out weigh the benifits of a low maintence SV1000. The VFR has linked brakes (odd wear patterns), Cam chain issues (new ones), charging issues (Stator, reg/rec, battery) Every 25000km put away $900 or better for a valve adjustment service (Vtec models).

The SV1000 on the other hand is simple to work on, oil filter is right in behind the front wheel, valves are simple enough to do (3 hrs service not 9). But it's not without issues. Soft rims comes to mind. Lionel and Jimmy both warped theirs on rough roads (such as here). A few have had some mechanical issues, cam chains tensiors can get noisey. Suspension is like your 650, budget....mind you, your a fucking light weight so it's a non issue anyway.

I'd say ride the VFR for a day on your favorite roads and honestly ask yourself if you can afford to service it. Roy say's he get's over 300kms to the fuel tank, 20+ liters of fuel for huge range, SV not so much, 14 liters or so and empty at 160kms. Ridden hard, 120.
 

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From N00bie to Wannabe
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VFR 800 or 1200?
 

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I know the feeling when it comes to in line 4s, ever since I've been on the V4 I would find it hard to give up out right. My current bike is the 5th gen 2000 VFR800(gear driven cam's, pre-v-tech) I love the bike. The sound of the motor is one of my favorite parts of the bike, the other I love is the single arm swing arm, more unique among bikes. I don't have the experience of owning the SV1000, the maintenance on my VFR isnt so bad, the v4's are near bullet proof they say. A valve adjustment on any fuel injected bike is pricey these days if I'm not mistaken, but the v-techs are more that is for sure, which is one of the reasons I avoided them. I haven't hand any issues with my gen, but I have been warned that the 6th gen's till 04/05 if i remember right did have some electrical issues.


My question to you is, what VFR would you be planing on? the 750 800 or 1200? the VFR1200 is one of the coolest bikes i know of, and have only heard good things about them. But if your thinking about the 800, make sure you get the right year. And as side warning, your in the nice cheaper bracket for insurance right now being under 750, going to the 800 or 1000 can put a pinch on the wallet.

I personally don't care much for the style of the SV1000, it's kinda generic. But if you want more options for some cool V motor bikes, look into aprilia bikes like the mille or shiver. Very cool bikes, and quite fairly priced from what I've seen of them, there are some good deals on them at the Yamaha dealer in Chilliwack.
 

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My wife owns a 2006 VFR and I have ridden a 2004 SV1000. Both are great bikes, but it depends on what you want to do with the bike.

VFR - pluses - comfort, build quality, suspension, looovely V4 motor
minuses - cost, maintenance costs for Vtec (although valve adjustments are usually unneeded), heavy (although disappears in motion), and weird old guys seem to favour them (ha! apologies to weird old Viffer owners!)

SV1000 - pluses - great sounding engine with an aftermarket exhaust, lighter weight, cheaper purchase and maintenance cost
minuses - comfort (for me, I ride an R1 but found the SV1000 worse for some reason), suspension a little rougher/more budget

Want to do long distance tours? VFR. Want to rip around locally and love twins? SV1000
 

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D.I.L.L.I.G.A.F.
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352 Posts
I love V-Twins too, but the next best thing is a V-4, especially if it has a nice Yosh pipe throttling the sound. I would look for a low mileage, gear drive VFR. By low mileage I mean anything under 80k kms. I have owned both (a 2000 and 2005 V-Tec). The pluses of the V-Tec are the linked ABS brakes (they only have to save your ass once on a wet road to appreciate them), the fuel range (300kms+) and the great handling and suspension. The only downside of the V-Tec for us was the high cost of valve adjustment. It did leave us stranded once in Winchester, Idaho (great roads) with a wiring meltdown that Honda later issued a recall on. I also had to replace the stator at 40k kms. Honda parts prices are extortionate in Canada compared to the U.S. Either of the V-4's are bullet proof and you can run them to redline all day if you want.

Don't listen to PeeWee. He hates Honda's for some reason. Too bad, he doesn't know what he's missing.
 

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awful human
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A valve adjustment on any fuel injected bike is pricey these days if I'm not mistaken, but the v-techs are more that is for sure, which is one of the reasons I avoided them.
Pretty much all performance oriented bikes from the late 1980's to present use the shim under bucket system to set valve clearance. Whether a bike is fuel injected or not has no bearing on how expensive the valve check / adjustment will be. Something like VTEC however adds a whole nother' level of complexity (expense).

The way that the valves are checked is the same on a 1986 gsxr 750 and a 2011 gsxr 750. Then there's ducati...... hahahahaha



.
 

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Thank You Vets
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PeeWee pretty much nailed it .............

You just cant go wrong with either bike ......Personally I like the VFR 800 and if price is not an issue ( new or used ), these bikes can do it all . Race saturday , duffy lake loop sunday and commute Monday 2 friday ...... these have been considered a top riders choice for many many years now . The SV however is reliable , cheap and has some gumtion , and coming of the little sister and wanting more punch the big SV might be a natural feel and a good upgrade . I took a good look at the SV but it just doesn't hit that excite button for me .......Good luck with whatever you choose ........
 

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Ride Solo
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I'd be somewhat leery of the VTEC VFR just because of the added complexity of checking the valves. Once you uncover the motor on a gear-driven cam bike, it's not that bad to check the valves (although the fasteners and tabs on my '93's bodywork make it a nightmare, especially now that things are old and brittle). I last checked mine around 160,000km, and everything was in spec. The one and only shim changed was at 100,000, so I feel comfortable stretching the valve check interval. It's definitely not a quick DIY job, so I'd never try it if I didn't have a workspace.

I've never ridden an SV1000, although I did race the 650. If I was in the market for a bike right now, I'd be considering the SV along with newer VFR's and a few other bikes, but budgeting a bit of $$ for suspension. If it rides like a big SV650, it would suit me fine; I might even give up the hard bags.
 

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Buy yourself a BlackBird. Best bang for your buck. Still available from 4-6 thou. Often with lots of add ons. I don't spend $900 a year on mine.
 

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H2O Turbo Fitness
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Discussion Starter #13
VFR 800 or 1200?
800 for sure. If I was going to go 1200 it would be a Honda or BMW ST, but eff man sat on the beemer at the dealer and hated the weight. I want something I can throw around a bit! So from the sounds of it the SV1000 is better for that.

Aprilia = bee-oo-ti-ful! But too bulky. Shiver = don't like riding naked bikes, especially on trips.

From what you've given so far, the biggest difference is the cost of maintenance (particularly the valves) since the electrical & suspension on the SV (at least the 650) isn't great, and the mileage. Seats can always be adjusted or changed ;) Might be worth going on some test rides next... I'm in no rush to buy (that's a killer in the market anyway, and I'd like to look around for the right one not just 'one of many'), so keep the info. coming!
 

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just a thought, but have you considered the Sprint ST (not the new GT, which is more touring oriented). I ride an SV650, and test rode an ST last summer - I found it like a 'grown up' SV - comfy, nice sound, good power but not waaay out beyond the SV, much better brakes. if you're looking to the VFR because you tour, this might be a good middle ground. and nowhere near as 'tricky' as the Honda...
 

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I saw the thread about the SV1000 vs. the VTR, but I'm not interested in the VTR (especially after reading the thread... and the age of the thread lol). I grew out of my 2001 SV650 last summer, but wanted to give it an extra season and yep - a few local rides and a 1k+ road trip later in the last couple weeks and I'm starting to look for my next bike.

So post 'em up, what you think, what you have, articles, threads, pics - the more information I have the better! :thumbup
*Do note that although the newer R1s are sweet, I've test ridden a few different bikes (including the R1) and just can't bring myself to ride an inline four... yet.
Funny enough, the same two bikes were on my short list as well. My wife has the same SV as you and I love that bike for two reasons. One is I love riding it, two is I love maintaining it.
For those reasons I contemplated the SV1000 since it would be a great upgrade for me. I was looking at something over 100hp, but not really much over that so 120 would have been nice. But instead I went with a 103hp VFR, and an old one to that, the 3rd gen(I personally thing they are one of the best looking bikes ever). My riding is mostly trips and that's where VFR is king. If you ask VFR guys, they will tell you that 3rd or 4th gen VFR is the best VFR ever, depending whom you ask(mind you they are VERY similar). I personally don't care for 5th gen but would love a white 6th gen.

So, like somebody said, if you're into trips, go with the VFR. If I were you, I perhaps wouldn't rule out 4th generation either even though they are over 14 years old now. Gear driven VFRs last 200k easily, 300k is not uncommon, some hit 500+. I was very surprised when doing the research that the advice was basically "don't worry about it, nothing on these engines ever breaks". LOL
I saw... actually heard, this video and was sold(I might have posted it before, if so, sorry for repost)... :D
http://youtu.be/iU4B5QUnVHM
 

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How about Suzuki Bandit 1200/1250?

I know you love twins, me too. However, silky smooth big inline-4 won't take toll on body after frequent road-trips. This bike is under the radar, you can buy and run it dirt cheap, great workhorse.

Myself will run a 650 dakar for touring co, super comfy and 300+km fuel range. Easy to spot the group from high up, fun bike to ride to anywhere up to 150km/h.

If money is no issue (haha, like most business, "just wriite it off!") - Ducati ST3. That will inpress your clients. :court

(yes, it is tough to find your next ride after SV, a freaking cheap fun versatile bike. if it wasn't my Shiver is such a great deal, I was gonna to pick up a 5th gen VFR, one of the best sporty 2up bike.)
 

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Lee RideFar
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Having just spent the past 50,000kms on a 2004 VFR I have seen it all with that bike. Took the WCSB race course on it, rode it all over the western United States, and alot of Mt. Baker runs. I have seen the worst of the VFR too and the electrical issues have left me stranded a few times. Installed a VFRness made from a member on VFRdiscussion.com and that has solved the electrical issues. Despite the grief this bike has caused me I have enjoyed riding it alot. Good comfort level and good power. It is an all around bike that does everything good. If you do end up buying a VFR you will not be disappointed just make sure you buy the 2008-2009 model year. It wouldn't hurt to buy a voltmeter and fuse off any accessories you add onto it as well. The voltmeter is a good warning system.

I am selling my VFR soon and was looking for a used K1300S/K1200S but I could not find one in the specs that I wanted. I too was hesitant about going back to a silky smooth inline 4. It's funny you should mention you briefly looked into a R1. Look again! I just bought a 2010 R1 and I am importing it. The Cross Plane Crank on the new R1 motor is beautiful. Yes it is a inline 4 but it sounds and pulls more like a V4 or V-twin. If you are ok with a comfort level of a super sport have another look at the R1.

Here is a video by Yamaha explaining the Cross Plane Crank; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvTXMtTTKQw
 

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From N00bie to Wannabe
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4,839 Posts
Fortunately for the OP; I am completely unbiased in my opinion. Having rolled over 100,000 kms on my 2005 VFR800ABS which is currently stripped down for a completely unnecessary major Preventative Maintenance (that I'm doing myself, including valve adjustments) and considering I am planning to ride it into my grave, you can rest assured knowing my advice is untainted when I suggest you get a VFR. The only caveat is: I've never considered the cost of maintenance other than it's the cost you must pay to play. If budget is of concern; I'd stick with the SV.
 
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