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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm in the market looking for a television right now and i just wanted to get some questions straight. I was told that LCOS technology is the newest and greatest compared to LCD and plasma's? is that true? if not what is the best technology for image quality?

Also i was told you would need HDMI to use newer technology such as Blu-ray and HD-DVD players, i was also wondering if that was true

Thanks
 

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Component, DVI, HDMI. What's next? My THX receiver only handles component and it's brand new. As ssoon as you buy anything with HDMI it will be superceded.

I wouldn't worry too much about connectors. Quality cables on a component connection have been proven time and time to deliver clearer and stronger signal than crap cable on DVI or HDMI. It's not a matter of what is better, it a connector format war. We'll see who wins out like coax did.

As to HD-DVD. The only movies out right now that you or I can buy are in Blu-Ray. BR players are double the price of others players but that won't last long. The format war there is just beginning so I'd pass on worry about that too.

If you live in a condo, find a good LCD. If you have room, go with rear projection. Now the next person will totally tell you HDMI is the only way to go.

I tried a lot of different connectors, my setup still looks the same component and it works with my receiver. You want a receiver with HDMI on it? Big $$. That assumes you use a your TV as a monitor and plug all video inputs into your receiver.

Can you hear the difference between a $2000 receiver and a $4000 one? Can you tell one liter bike makes 155 bhp and the other one makes 152 bhp?

Audiophiles and Videophiles are worse that sportbike riders when it comes to "best gear" pissing contests.

So to answer your question, only Toshiba has announced their unit will be HDMI only. This will change. People will not go buy new TVs or receivers just to watch on a HD-DVD what they can download to their PVR. I already watch HD movies. Would I spend another $4000 on gear so I can use discs? Nope. How many HDTVs out there do you think have HDMI? Not the majority of them right now.
 

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From the HDMI.org site here.

HDMI is fully backward compatible with PCs,displays and consumer electronics devices incorporating the Digital Visual Interface (DVI) standard. Both HDMI and DVI were pioneered by Silicon Image and are based on TMDS®, Silicon Image's powerful, high-speed, serial link technology. HDMI supports standard, enhanced, or high-definition video, plus multi-channel digital audio on a single cable. It transmits all ATSC HDTV standards and supports 8-channel digital audio, and with 5 Gbps of bandwidth, HDMI can accommodate future enhancements and requirements. Because HDMI was designed specifically for consumer electronics applications, it offers an array of additional consumer enhancements. As digital content can manifest itself in a variety of sizes, resolutions and formats, HDMI-enabled systems will automatically configure to display content in the most effective format. In addition, HDMI enables a single remote point and click, allowing manufacturers to deliver home theater systems that automatically configure from a single command from a remote control -- turning on or off the components necessary to view a DVD, listen to a CD, or watch cable or satellite TV.
That's the whole marketing/technology bit. The real reason why the industry is advocating HDMI is because it also supports a certain HD encryption scheme. My understanding is that consumer available HD content is going to have a copy protection built in to the players so that you can only replay the HD signal through the HDMI connection. This way, they hope to avoid the piracy issues they are now experiencing with DVDs.

LCOS technology is a projector technology. If you are looking for a direct view television, you have only three choices: LCD, Plasma, CRT (tube).

This is a great resource for projector information here.

Finally, you're best off spending some time on this site here. Most of your answers are probably going to be found on that site.

As to the best technology for image quality, I think it will be quite subjective. I would suggest you spend some time getting to know a representative from one of the better audio/video shops in town (i.e. Commercial Electronics) and set up appointments for a couple of viewing sessions so you can see first hand the difference in technologies.

My personal choice right now for direct view TVs is still the good old CRT tube (specifically, a Sony HS model). I find that because the LCDs and Plasmas are fixed pixel displays, when they resample an image that is not the native resolution (the same number of pixels the screen shows), artifacts are created. A good example of this is if you have a laptop and you run a 640x480 game on it. The graphics card 'stretches' the 640 image over the whole screen (say 1024x768), making the individual pixels into 'blocks' and the whole image, though magnified, is jagged and chunky.

I won't bother getting into who has a better upscaler, because that is a whole nother page of words I'm sure no one is interested in...

Hope this helps.
 

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I still find a lot of this stuff confusing, and overwhelming, to be honest. I'm not a complete noob in the home theatre world, but with the rapid changes in technology, this is one boy who's glad he doesn't currently have the cash in hand to tempt me to upgrade. :)
 

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Ok. So new Tvs is it, well for starters let me tell you why HDMI is in fact a better cable to use. Its the idea behind it being a digital signal, where as component is still an analog signal. When Bluray come out, which isn't until july or so, then companies such as Warner Bros, Atlantis etc. do have the option of having their hd-dvds or blu-ray dvds 'downscale' the picture so you don't get the proper resolution out of it. IT almost halves the picture you'd be getting from your dvd. So far all the companies have said they won't so it, but this doesn't stop them from changing their minds later on.

As for which type of display to use, Its completely up to you. Projection TVs have a SLIGHT veiwing angle problem, however unless you get to the old style of projection tvs its really not that bad. however if its direct view you are looking for then If you're ok with a big tv thats heavy and bulky CRT is currently the best type. LCDs and Plasmas are both sleeker but they do have a bit of artifacting and what not. Panasonics new Plasma will play at a native resolution of 1080p and looks spectacular, but until blu-ray comes out there isn't any content that is available in 1080p.

Now as for finding a reciever with a HDMI input on it, you only need it if you're getting surround sound. Now this is strongly reccomended if you're getting yourself a nice big TV as the sound is part of the television expirience, and finding a reciever with HDMI in it is really not that difficult but you may have to spend a few bucks to do it.

A couple more things, as far as i know toshiba's HD dvd player will have both HDMI and component hookups on it. to start there will be NO copyright encryption jazz on it to downscale the images. there will be very few selections for movies but it should build. however they are about 6-700 bucks for a player. Toshiba is however coming out with a technology for TVs that uses tons of tiny little crt style pixels to make up a direct view television that is using the much better crt technology. its also supposed to be similar in depth to a plasma panel. However there isn't really an ETA on it yet.

So in short, HDMI is better than component, For a direct view TV go with CRT if you don't mind Bulkyness and weight, if you want a sleek tv it would depend on the size you want for either LCD or Plasma. Lastly, Blu-Ray and HD-DVDs will use both component and HDMI but won't require one or the other.
 
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