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I've read that if watching TV/Movies in a dark room it causes eyestrian, and if your TV is backlit at 6500k that it makes it easier to watch. Anyone have that setup? Where did you get the light?

Thanks
 
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most tv's have different settings for colour.
ever been to a theatre? i thought it was reading and fine details in poor light that caused strain. but everyones eyes are different. strain on one person might be totally fine for another.
 

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I'm so ignorant sometimes.
What the hell is 6500K?
 

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contradiction incarnate
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Team Green 9R said:
I've read that if watching TV/Movies in a dark room it causes eyestrian, and if your TV is backlit at 6500k that it makes it easier to watch. Anyone have that setup? Where did you get the light?

Thanks
It's true. If the viewable area of your screen is relatively small compared to your field of vision (ie. not a massive screen - like 100" at 12' away) and the room is dark, your eyes are strained more.

It won't necessarily need to be exactly 6500K to get good results.
Basically a small lamp on a rheostat/dimmer set up behind the screen will do.
The whiter the light is, the better, but not that big a deal.

For the correct level, you can use a calibration DVD like "Joe Kane's Video Essentials".
But, realistically, you'll just need to set it low enough that the light level it's putting out is as close as possible to the light the screen is putting out.

In other words, you want the brightness level to be as even as possible throughout your field of vision. It'll never really be perfect, because the program material you're watching will be changing in brightness level all the time.
For example, you're watching something like a space scene... mostly black with some brighter spots.
Then you've got a daylight scene with bright sky, grass, bright colours generally.
The relative brightness levels are quite different between the two.
You're not about to adjust the dimmer to compensate every time there's a lighting change on screen.
Just find a happy medium.
 
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SpideRider said:
I'm so ignorant sometimes.
What the hell is 6500K?
the heat range of the lamp. the hotter it is (not hot as in heat), the whiter and more brilliant it is.
 

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Ahh, I see.
So what kind of lighting could you compare 6500K to so I can visualize the brightness?
 

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SpideRider said:
Ahh, I see.
So what kind of lighting could you compare 6500K to so I can visualize the brightness?
in broadcast terms, 6500K is pure white... higher or lower will be more red or more blue tints.
 

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Gotcha. :thumbup
 

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forget the lighting... spend about $1500 on a front projector and black out the room.

massive image (of high quality) and no ambient light matching issues :rockon
 

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We have two table lamps, one on either side of the TV, on dimmers. We turn them to about half-brightness while watching movies, and it's quite nice. Lots more comfortable than watching with no lights, and feels more "theatre-like" than watching with the ceiling lights on.

For the full theatre-experience, though, you should put crown moldings about 8" down from the ceiling all the way around, and then put rope lights in them. It up-lights the ceiling, bringing up the ambient light level in the room without feeling like you're in a living room.
 
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