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im gonna take a really wild guess and say you're not a pilot.
Um... Aeronautical Engineer, PPL for the past 10 years, flying since born. I think I have at least *some* idea what i'm talking about. :)

putting a motorcycle in a cessna is totally different than doing aerobatics. second of all, cessnas are certified to do spins, spiral dives, stalls, etc (and every training school is required to do those maneuvers with their students) so you saying that isn't not certified for it, is wrong.
Yes, Cessna 172's are certified to do the manoeuvers you list. I don't see rolls in that list, which is what you were describing. Check the owner's manual, it's not certified for rolls, let alone sustained inverted flight (which is required to get the engine to quit). Ergo not legal, nor particularly safe or smart.

as long as you don't exceed the G limit in the + or - direction and respect the V speeds, you will be fine in any aircraft.
Very true... And there's no question that Bob Hoover can fly an aerobatic routine in anything with wings. But he's got a huge bucket of experience to draw from. You don't.

"aerobatic" aircraft just have a higher G limit of say around +9g to -7g and the C-172 is +3.8g to -1.5g and therefore are better suited for complicated aerobatics.
From the CAR's: Aerobatic is +6,-3. Utility is +4.4,-1.8. Normal is +3.8,-1.5.

C-172's are certified for Utility category, but are definitely *not* suited for complicated aerobatics. I'd like to talk to your instructor, he needs to be given a serious talking to if he's been teaching you that.

Get some time doing some real acro in an airplane suited to the task. You'll have a heck of a lot more fun.
 

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Having an engine cut out at 5000 feet is still safer than having an unrecoverable CoG shift though :)
Um... So a situation that's recoverable is safer than one that isn't recoverable. Well, no sh*t, eh? :)

Intentionally stopping the engine in flight is asking for trouble. Sure, it *should* re-start. Sure, there's every indication that the plane is well maintained and that nothing will go wrong to prevent it from re-starting. But there's any number of things that can go wrong to prevent it. For example, the handle on the starter pull cable came off in my hand once while doing a routine start on a Cessna 150. I'd flown the plane at least 30 times without incident, and without any indication of an impending problem. If that happened in flight, no restart (well, not with the starter, anyway... there are other ways).
 

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Um... Aeronautical Engineer, PPL for the past 10 years, flying since born. I think I have at least *some* idea what i'm talking about. :)


Yes, Cessna 172's are certified to do the manoeuvers you list. I don't see rolls in that list, which is what you were describing. Check the owner's manual, it's not certified for rolls, let alone sustained inverted flight (which is required to get the engine to quit). Ergo not legal, nor particularly safe or smart.


Very true... And there's no question that Bob Hoover can fly an aerobatic routine in anything with wings. But he's got a huge bucket of experience to draw from. You don't.


From the CAR's: Aerobatic is +6,-3. Utility is +4.4,-1.8. Normal is +3.8,-1.5.

C-172's are certified for Utility category, but are definitely *not* suited for complicated aerobatics. I'd like to talk to your instructor, he needs to be given a serious talking to if he's been teaching you that.

Get some time doing some real acro in an airplane suited to the task. You'll have a heck of a lot more fun.
I respect all your experience, but it's kind of hard to really say what kind of pilot I am when you've never met me or flown with me. I've had almost 11 yrs of actual flying experience, I started flying when I was 10 and I'll be 21 at the end of the month. And about experience, I know a guy who has been flying for 2 years.... and still doesn't have his PPL. Everyone progresses differently and some have a natural talent for it. As for myself I'm not trying to say I'm like the best but I can hold my own. I flew with an Air Canada A-340 Captain awhile ago who had about 20000 hrs and he told me that I was one of the best pilots he's flown with. I take that as a compliment but I'm not cocky about it; as you probably know a cocky pilot is one of the most dangerous.

I never stated that a Cessna was approved for complicated aerobatics, nor did any instructor, they can do them but I said that an aerobatic aircraft is more suited. (IE: Cessnas could do a hammerhead but making it over the top smoothly would be quite tough with a small engine. And if you did happen to enter a tail slide it might not end nicely.) My brother's instructor has snap rolled a C-172 and Tex Johnston barrel rolled a Boeing 707. Yes, the CARs do state a lower G rating for aerobatic aircraft but that is the lower limit, most aerobatic aircraft are closer to what I had said. That being said, I would never do a 90 degree vertical dive in a Cessna. The V speeds would be exceeded in seconds and to recover would most likely exceed the G limit.

All in all, I don't recommend doing these maneuvers to just anyone. It all depends on your level of ability, confidence and proper instruction on the specific maneuver. It is very dangerous doing pretty much any maneuver in an aircraft because if not properly flown they can easily get out of hand even with an experienced pilot at the controls. How many reports have you heard of ppl stalling on final approach and entering a spiral dive? There has been quite a few. I'm comfortable taking the risks involved with flying and performing maneuvers. I also have had aerobatics training.

I hope this explains why I would feel more comfortable doing a roll in a Cessna rather than carrying a motorcycle in the back. That's all I'm trying to say.
 

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as you probably know a cocky pilot is one of the most dangerous.
I was trying to say that only a cocky pilot (or a very experienced one) does acro in a plane not certified for it. Bob Hoover and Tex Johnson *are* experienced. You (and I, for that matter) aren't.

I never stated that a Cessna was approved for complicated aerobatics
"aerobatic" aircraft just have a higher G limit of say around +9g to -7g and the C-172 is +3.8g to -1.5g and therefore are better suited for complicated aerobatics.
Ah, I see what you were trying to say now... It was just your grammar that was faulty along with your G-limits. :)

I'm comfortable taking the risks involved with flying and performing maneuvers. I also have had aerobatics training.
Both are good things for a pilot to have. But I would bet that you were trained in an aerobatic airplane (as was I) and it was made pretty clear that you shouldn't be doing the same things in a non-aerobatic airplane.

I hope this explains why I would feel more comfortable doing a roll in a Cessna rather than carrying a motorcycle in the back. That's all I'm trying to say.
Keep in mind, that carrying a motorcycle in the plane is completely within the plane's design envelope, unlike aerobatics. What does the bike weigh? 400 lb? That's no different than putting two large men in your plane. Properly secured, it wouldn't be a problem at all. It would also be legal, unlike doing acro.

If you're ever up someday rolling your cessna and the engine quits, and you land off-field and damage the plane, don't count on any insurance covering you.
 

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Ah, I see what you were trying to say now... It was just your grammar that was faulty along with your G-limits. :)
that's not true. a Christen Eagle II has structural Limits of +9g, -6g. every aerobatic aircraft is different so I'm sorry i didn't list all the possible G limits for every aircraft.


Keep in mind, that carrying a motorcycle in the plane is completely within the plane's design envelope, unlike aerobatics. What does the bike weigh? 400 lb? That's no different than putting two large men in your plane. Properly secured, it wouldn't be a problem at all. It would also be legal, unlike doing acro.
and how would you properly secure a motorcycle in a Cessna, are you joking? have you seen the size of the baggage compartment? you'd definitely have to take out the rear bench seat (C-172). then you'd have to take out at least the front seat, possibly both front seats to fit it in, and honestly i really don't think it would fit that well. (compared to a sitting person the bike is pretty tall) but lets say it does fit, then you have to properly secure it. how? well you'd have to modify the aircraft, bolt on attachment points for harnesses, chock it, etc. where would you bolt on the attachment points? on the wall? the floor? I can't think of any place that is suitable to withstand the G limits of the aircraft and secure that weight. and you'd have to take off the interior paneling to get at the frame to secure it. so lets say you do find a place to bolt the attachment points to and you finally secure it properly. then you have to put the front seats back in and secure them. now you've got quite the modified cessna. who is gonna let you do that to their cessna in the first place? if you go to the airports around here and ask every pilot you see with a C-172 or similar aircraft to transport a motorcycle in his airplane, he'd prob laugh at you and think you were crazy..... can you see where im going with this? it's absolutely ridiculous to try to transport a motorcycle in a Cessna like that. and if you were grasping what i was saying, you'd also realize that it would be VERY unsafe to do so. so like i said, leave it to the pros to do if you have to transport it in an airplane.

and you're saying that rolling a cessna is just the same as flying a motorcycle in the back? (i dunno exactly what you were trying to say but you couldn't understand why im comfortable rolling a cessna and not comfortable flying a motorcycle in the back.) well rolling is a lot safer, and easier for that matter. pitch up 10 to 15 degrees, initiate a coordinated roll to the left or right, recover, resume level flight. and of course you would do the safety checks and lookout before doing any maneuver like that, and be in a designated practice area. if i was doing a roll in a Christen Eagle II, i'd pretty much just have to slide the stick left or right with a little rudder and then recover. don't really need to pitch up. as long as you understand that flying a specific maneuver is different in every aircraft and you're trained on that specific aircraft I don't see why there would be a problem. and btw doing a roll in a cessna would not cause the engine to quit. and you could do barrel rolls all day, and if properly flown, the engine would never quit because its 1g through the whole roll. the reason it quit for me was because i held it inverted for a couple seconds.

EDIT: btw, its not "acro", that's what the boys and girls in tights do for fun. "aerobatics" are done in an airplane.
 

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Frankly, I'm still disappointed that we don't know WHY someone would want to put an R1 in a Cessna... Please enlighten!!!
 

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Frankly, I'm still disappointed that we don't know WHY someone would want to put an R1 in a Cessna... Please enlighten!!!
Anyone ever tried fitting a sportbike in a Cessna, or any other smaller personal aircraft? Which planes will have the payload capacity for a bike and spares, and the ability to get the bike in and out?
Says he wants a bike and spares.

Wild guess is he wants to race out of town. Maybe lives in a small town?
Stays at the Under the Wing Motel!
 

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So to answer the original question:

A Cessna 172 has the carrying capacity for a bike and spares, but access is going to be a right bitch, and you'll need to rig up a way to tie the bike down. Do-able, but not easy.

A better bet might be a Cardinal, that has no strut on the wing and the door opens 180degrees and sits flat against the fuselage. It's a good sized door, too, so you'll have better access to the compartment. As with the 172, the seats will have to come out, and you'll need to attach tiedowns to the seat attach points to secure the bike in place. Remember that a bike doesn't weigh any more than two large men, and the seat attach points were designed to take that weight, so you should be okay. I think the Cardinal fuselage even sits lower to the ground than the 172, so you wouldn't have to raise the bike so high to get it in. Make sure you find one with at least the 160hp engine, preferably the 180hp. With the 150hp engine the plane is a little underpowered.

Getting bigger, a 337 also has good access through the doors, more room in the cabin, and two engines (maybe the added redundancy is important to you). You'd probably be able to carry a passenger, too.

The bigger problem with Cessnas might be the height of the doorway. Carrying capacity aside, I suspect the doorways aren't tall enough to get a bike through... But that's just a gut feel, i've never measured.

And finally, you could consider a Beaver. Oodles of carrying capacity, and you might not even need to take seats out. But it sits a lot higher off the ground, so rolling the bike up the ramp to get it in will be even harder. And they're bloody expensive.
 

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Cessnas 208 Grand Caravan would easily carry a sportbike, Even a 206 Stationair would do but loading in the 208 would be much easier!. The 208 has a large cargo door at the rear of the plane and enough room for maybe 4 sportbikes (with all the seats removed ofcourse). The 206's usefull load should allow it to carry 2 ppl as well as the bike and spareparts, the only thing with the 206 there may only be enough room in the cabin for the pilot and bike- no passangers!

Depends on your budget...the Grand caravan will set you back $1.1 to $1.3 million and you will have to have some turbine time to fly it!

The Stationair will only set you back $650,000 and a ppl with a high performance endorsement will let you fly it.
 

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Anyone ever tried fitting a sportbike in a Cessna, or any other smaller personal aircraft? Which planes will have the payload capacity for a bike and spares, and the ability to get the bike in and out?
Cessna 206 the the front wheel off probably. There a few pc-12's that carry full sized hds. Some of the bush plane pilots carry them. One is carried in a pod under the plane. But a realistic price point the 206 will be the best bet. Also will carry a quad
 

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If you're taking a Cessna to a track day...the bonus is that you can land the plane on the front straight and avoid the hassle of the airport!
 

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An R1 is what ....... 450lbs tops? Into a 180 once partially di-asssembled, piece of cake. A 172 would be a huge stretch and a 152 a waste of time.
 
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